Saturday, July 11, 2020

Writing Essays About Poverty Topic Ideas

Writing Essays About Poverty Topic IdeasPoverty essays will vary greatly in topic selection. The different topics will fall into one of two categories, depending on your use of it as a college essay. Your topic can be about the environment and/or the development of humankind.Depending on what country you live in, the environment and/or global issues may be a primary concern. In other countries or cultures, however, topics that deal with poverty itself may be the focus. For example, in some Middle Eastern countries, poverty is seen as an inherent problem, rather than as something caused by national institutions, policies or personal greed.Because of this variety of topics, some students use it as a springboard for a more in-depth discussion of their subject, or other information. Some use it as a means to express a range of viewpoints and point of view, or as a vehicle for expressing ideas not related to their area of study. In either case, they consider it a way to get their classmat es thinking.Every topic has its own meaning, so when students consider the multiple areas of interest they will be faced with, they will have to decide which ones are more important to them. For example, they may find a topic that is all about the environment to be more appropriate for a science major, while others may feel that a story about a local project rather than a student's family background is more meaningful. With some students, the topic may be their highest interest. Then, they may choose the appropriate topic from that.Of course, different people may find all of these essay topics and essays compelling, and others may find them confusing or unattractive. So, they will need to be very careful about their choices, and make sure that their essays are thoroughly thought out and well written.Even when students learn about these different essay topics, there will still betimes when they use them to get their classmates involved. And that is one of the reasons why this is an e xcellent essay topic for advanced-level courses. You can explain the importance of particular institutions, national issues, and national policy toward poverty through different essay topics, without having to simply include them all.Using a simple idea to explain a complex issue is an excellent way to help students reach their potential and learn. Students who write papers using interesting, descriptive, and quirky ideas tend to come out with a better understanding of how the world works. These students also learn to think differently, which is a valuable quality for any student to learn.Students may find that a number of their classmates also have a passion for topics like poverty, global issues, development, and the environment. And that means that they can discuss these subjects with each other and create a valuable discussion of a real issue, rather than just sending someone to bed at night.

Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelts Progressivism - 550 Words

Comparing and Contrasting Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelt's Progressivism (Essay Sample) Content: Authors Name:Instructors Name:Institutional Affiliation:Course Details:Date of Submission:Comparing and Contrasting Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelts Progressivism IntroductionTheodore Roosevelt formed the Progressive party after he was overlooked for the presidential spot in the Republican Party. Some of the objectives of the progressive party included fulfilling the expectations of the womens suffrage movement, ensuring the direct election of state senators, implementing various social reforms and enacting the reduction of tariffs. The Progressive party was also deeply interested in the preservation of the nations natural resources. Even though policies such as the formation of a nationalized health care system brought a lot of support for the party, its aim to allow monopolies to function under definite regulations went against public opinion. Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilsons different versions of ProgressivismWoodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelt were b oth affiliated with the Progressive party, but had different views about fulfilling its main objectives. Woodrow Wilson's progressivism, under the New Freedom theme, sought to do away with all trusts in order to advance economic competition. Wilson also believed that the federal government did not need to regulate businesses. According to him, this was a power that fell under the jurisdiction of state governments. In his New Freedom speeches which he made in 1912, Wilson stated that progressivism stipulated that the nations laws had to keep up with the constant economic shifts being experienced in the country (Wilson, 1913). Wilson was in support of the modern idea of changing carefully to accommodate new reforms in various public sectors. This version of Wilson's progressivism challenged the structure of the American Constitution itself. Wilson perceived the Constitution as being mechanical in an era in which American citizens had more wealth and opportunities than were available i n the time of the Founding Fathers (Wertheim, 2011). Conversely, Theodore Roosevelt's version of Progressivism, known as New Nationalism, supported the call for more empowerment of the position of the President (Roosevelt, 2011). Roosevelt also believed that the federal government should also be given additional powers so that it could successfully check the abuse of power in corporate circles. The central issue, according to Roosevelt, was to ensure that the government was enabled to be the main protector of property rights as well as human welfare. In regards to the issue of monopolies, Roosevelt felt that if industries respected the existing regulations, they would actually benefit the nation. He did not feel that the courts should be allowed to regulate business, but that executive agencies were more likely to undertake that responsibility efficiently. The New Nationalism was also supportive of the enactment of minimum wage regulations for women and child labor laws. Roosevelts New Nationalism and Wilsons New Freedom mainly differed in the use of the powers of federal governmental power. While Wilson was against using federal power, Roosevelt was for it. Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilsons Presidential; Performances Theodore Roosevelt accomplished many things in office. For instance, apart from assisting with the construction of the Panama Canal, he also fortified the Monroe Doctrine which addresses the involvement of America in foreign matters. In regards to his New Nationalism version of progressivism, Roosevelt was able to increase the powers of the President, while also implementing a two-pronged strategy of regulatory control and antitrust prosecutions in order to give the government more power over the national economy. In a new legislation, he empowered the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) to determine railroad rates. He was also able to realize conservation objectives. During his tenure, Roosevelt created 5 National Parks, 150 National Fores ts, 4 National Game Preserves, 18 National Monuments, 51 Federal Bird Reservations, and 21 Reclamation Projects (Roosevelt, 2011). Woodrow Wilsons New Freedom progressivism was aimed at crafting practical government responses to economic and social concerns of the day. During his presidency, Woodrow Wilson fulfilled this progressive agenda. In regards to tariff reform, he pushed for the the Underwood-Simmons Act, which then resulted in the most noteworthy reductions in rates in the past four decades. In the Federal Reserve Act which was ratified in 1913, twelve regional reserve banks were established (Wilson, 1913). These institutions would be controlled by a new fe... Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelts Progressivism - 550 Words Comparing and Contrasting Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelt's Progressivism (Essay Sample) Content: Authors Name:Instructors Name:Institutional Affiliation:Course Details:Date of Submission:Comparing and Contrasting Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelts Progressivism IntroductionTheodore Roosevelt formed the Progressive party after he was overlooked for the presidential spot in the Republican Party. Some of the objectives of the progressive party included fulfilling the expectations of the womens suffrage movement, ensuring the direct election of state senators, implementing various social reforms and enacting the reduction of tariffs. The Progressive party was also deeply interested in the preservation of the nations natural resources. Even though policies such as the formation of a nationalized health care system brought a lot of support for the party, its aim to allow monopolies to function under definite regulations went against public opinion. Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilsons different versions of ProgressivismWoodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelt were b oth affiliated with the Progressive party, but had different views about fulfilling its main objectives. Woodrow Wilson's progressivism, under the New Freedom theme, sought to do away with all trusts in order to advance economic competition. Wilson also believed that the federal government did not need to regulate businesses. According to him, this was a power that fell under the jurisdiction of state governments. In his New Freedom speeches which he made in 1912, Wilson stated that progressivism stipulated that the nations laws had to keep up with the constant economic shifts being experienced in the country (Wilson, 1913). Wilson was in support of the modern idea of changing carefully to accommodate new reforms in various public sectors. This version of Wilson's progressivism challenged the structure of the American Constitution itself. Wilson perceived the Constitution as being mechanical in an era in which American citizens had more wealth and opportunities than were available i n the time of the Founding Fathers (Wertheim, 2011). Conversely, Theodore Roosevelt's version of Progressivism, known as New Nationalism, supported the call for more empowerment of the position of the President (Roosevelt, 2011). Roosevelt also believed that the federal government should also be given additional powers so that it could successfully check the abuse of power in corporate circles. The central issue, according to Roosevelt, was to ensure that the government was enabled to be the main protector of property rights as well as human welfare. In regards to the issue of monopolies, Roosevelt felt that if industries respected the existing regulations, they would actually benefit the nation. He did not feel that the courts should be allowed to regulate business, but that executive agencies were more likely to undertake that responsibility efficiently. The New Nationalism was also supportive of the enactment of minimum wage regulations for women and child labor laws. Roosevelts New Nationalism and Wilsons New Freedom mainly differed in the use of the powers of federal governmental power. While Wilson was against using federal power, Roosevelt was for it. Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilsons Presidential; Performances Theodore Roosevelt accomplished many things in office. For instance, apart from assisting with the construction of the Panama Canal, he also fortified the Monroe Doctrine which addresses the involvement of America in foreign matters. In regards to his New Nationalism version of progressivism, Roosevelt was able to increase the powers of the President, while also implementing a two-pronged strategy of regulatory control and antitrust prosecutions in order to give the government more power over the national economy. In a new legislation, he empowered the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) to determine railroad rates. He was also able to realize conservation objectives. During his tenure, Roosevelt created 5 National Parks, 150 National Fores ts, 4 National Game Preserves, 18 National Monuments, 51 Federal Bird Reservations, and 21 Reclamation Projects (Roosevelt, 2011). Woodrow Wilsons New Freedom progressivism was aimed at crafting practical government responses to economic and social concerns of the day. During his presidency, Woodrow Wilson fulfilled this progressive agenda. In regards to tariff reform, he pushed for the the Underwood-Simmons Act, which then resulted in the most noteworthy reductions in rates in the past four decades. In the Federal Reserve Act which was ratified in 1913, twelve regional reserve banks were established (Wilson, 1913). These institutions would be controlled by a new fe...

Wednesday, May 20, 2020

The Eternal Power Of A Loving Bond Between Two People

Sonnet 116 by William Shakespeare comments on the eternal power of a loving bond between two people. The first quatrain begins with the argument for love’s constancy and stability despite the changes and unpredictable forces that rule human lives. In the second quatrain, the speaker continues to build his argument for the power of love comparing love to a beacon of safety and guidance. In the final quatrain, the speaker continues to build upon the strength of love when he moves to the subject of love’s power against time and death. The speaker ends the sonnet with a seemingly contradictory statement that his claims can only be untrue if no one has ever loved or he has never written. Shakespeare’s Sonnet 116 argues that love is superior to†¦show more content†¦The repetition and alliteration of the phrases â€Å"alters when it alteration finds† and â€Å"bends with the remover to remove† emphasize the idea that love does not change in the fa ce of changing circumstances (3-4). When love between two people is faced with change, whether it be in circumstances, appearance, or age, love stands its ground and remains strong. When external forces seek to remove love, love stays. In the second quatrain, the speaker continues to build upon his argument with the metaphor of the landmarks visible from sea and the North Star and an argumentative tone.. The speaker compares love to a stable fixture that is not shaken by external factors like weather: â€Å"O no, it is an ever-fixed mark, / That looks on tempests and is never shaken† (5-6). The metaphor comparing love to a beacon of safety in light of a powerful storm explains the ability for people to depend on love. It is as powerful as a landmark or lighthouse looking over the sea, and not moving despite the forces that move against it. A lighthouse serves as a beacon of safety and is visible from many vantage points, much like how love is often seen as an emotion that inv olves caring for others and keeping them from harm. Like a lighthouse visible from afar, love is also visible to and shared with those that may be close to a pair that share a loving bond. When the speaker begins the line with â€Å"O no,† it creates defensive tone that reflects the sonnet’sShow MoreRelatedThe Romantic Period Of British Literature1536 Words   |  7 Pageswhich all poets of each time period express in many different ways. Love in British Literature is much more than just romantic and simple type of love, it is a power and it affects everyone differently. Love is also presented through the poet’s works depending on what their conception of love is. It very rarely was about two individuals loving one another, and much more about what the author loved and how their love was portrayed through that. The first time period is the Romantic Period, whichRead MorePlatos View Of The Worldview Of Plato966 Words   |  4 Pagesobjects than the average man, he looked towards material objects having a transcendental aspect. This is what made Plato such an interesting philosopher. Not only was he able to look at the world in a more unique way, which showed that Plato was truly a loving person. He was certain that as a philosopher the only way to know the true meaning of real causes, and reasons for all events and things was to have the inner knowing of transcendental aspects. Plato’s research is unique compared to other philosophersRead MoreEverlasting Covenant: Isaiah 24: 1-51479 Words   |  6 PagesEverlasting Covenant – Isaiah 24: 1-5 God does not enter into any relationship without entering into a covenant. A covenant must consist of a relationship between humankind and God; and, it is eternal, which is why it is called an everlasting covenant. The everlasting covenant can only be broken if man fails to maintain an intimate and personal relationship with God or chooses separation from God through sin, as was the case with Israel. Their hearts had strayed and many sins entered their livesRead MoreSpeech: Should Wuthering heights be made relevant in todays society?1487 Words   |  6 PagesHowever, I must also admit, the context of this book, Wuthering Heights, have portrayed many relevant themes that are still existing today, even as I speak. Catherines decision of marriage is one example. My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary Nelly, I am Heathcliff. In this quote, Catherine was well aware of her love for Heathcliff claiming that they both have the same souls. She had no income or property of her own. HerRead MoreThe Christian Worldview And What Impacts Those Beliefs Have On My Own Worldview1290 Words   |  6 Pagesplace as the foundation of the power and influence. God created humanity and allowed for their fall. He positioned Jesus Christ to save humanity from itself, satisfy divine judgment, and to reconcile their relationship with God. This paper will explain how each component is essential to the Christian worldview and what impacts those beliefs have on my own worldview. God The Christian worldview revolves around God. In the textbook God is described as â€Å"unchanging, eternal, all-powerful, all-knowing,Read MoreAnalysis Of The Novel Uncle Tom s Cabin 1697 Words   |  7 Pagesestablishment of the portrayal of the female figure furthers Stowe’s pro-domesticity stance and the woman’s ability to indirectly undermine the structure of slavery. These descriptions serve as testaments to solidify the notion that Stowe’s end goal, getting people to â€Å"feel right,† is dependent upon the potential of the Christian mother figure. While the shortcomings of the mother/child relationships in the cases of Simon Legree, Augustine St. Clare and little Eva serve to further the plot and necessary elementsRead MoreMilton and Classical Predecessors967 Words   |  4 PagesAs shown in studies by researchers including Wilmon Brewer, the similarities between the works of Milton and his classical predecessors, such as Athenian bards Aeschylu s and Sophocles, strongly suggest their inspiration upon his work. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that Milton blatantly passed off the works of his influences as his own; his ingenuity manifests in the form of updated storylines and personalities for the characters in his epic poems, namely those in Samson Agonistes and ParadiseRead MoreReligion in The Merchant of Venice Essay1956 Words   |  8 PagesItalian City. Although filled with spiritual people, the city is divided into two different religious groups. Venice was primarily and dominantly a Christian society with Jews as it’s unfairly treated minority. Stereotypes classified Jews as immoral, evil, and foolish people while the Christians were graceful, merciful, and loving. Representing the Christian belief is Antonio who is summoned to court by a Jew who goes by the name Shylock. The cross between Christianity and Judaism begins as AntonioRead MoreLove for Marriage and Love for Convenience3074 Words   |  13 Pagesmarital love is eternal and perfect. Doesn’t a marriage start by promising eternal love? Isn’t it even considered as a sin if you break the vow? I have come to think recently that my view on marriage is just an idealised imagination. I always refused to face reality. Looking at our society very carefully, it seems that not all marriage partners share a strong passionate bonding of love, especially those who have grown old together. To be even precise, I cannot even see that bond through my parentsRead MoreModern Views Challenge Traditional Views Essay example1672 Words   |  7 Pagesof. Theories such as Evolution or The Big Bang would have been considered as just a silly made up story or a pack of lies. Why? People in the 1950s didnt have the technology and scientific equipment to theorise what we know today. They only knew what was provided for them at the time. God was real, we were all created by an all powerful, loving and knowing God, and the world was a result of his divine creation. Today we have theories, beliefs and knowledge that some of

Monday, May 18, 2020

The First Child Of Her Parents, Henry Viii Of England

Mary Tudor was the first child of her parents, Henry VIII of England and Catherine of Aragon, to survive until adulthood. Politically motivated, Henry was unsatisfied that his wife had not birthed a healthy son, and since he desired a son to succeed him, he attempted to get a divorce. In order to do so, since divorce was not allowed in the Catholic religion, he broke from Rome and made himself head of the church. Henry was eventually successful in bearing a son, and when he died in 1547, Edward, age nine at the time, took over the throne. King Henry and Edward both lead England with the influence of Protestantism, but there were still a lot of people who practiced Catholicism. Mary Tudor, Henry’s daughter, was dedicated to Catholicism; and when Edward passed away in 1553, she was next in line for the throne. From 1552 to 1558, Mary Tudor was the Queen of England. These years were the most prominent in regards to the conflict within the church between the Catholics and Protesta nts. As a dedicated Catholic, Mary’s overall objective was to unite the church; which was clearly a problem in itself, because she demanded Protestants to reconvert back into the Catholic religion. Mary’s overall movement became known as the Marian Church, and it’s agreed upon historiography can be described as polemical. The events that took place during these times were very controversial, especially since it involved one’s preference when practicing religion. One of the most contentious topicsShow MoreRelatedThe Exciting Life of King Henry VIII1297 Words   |  5 PagesTo begin with; Henry VIII was the King of England from April 21, 1509 until his death. King Henry VIII was born born on June 28th of 1491 in Palace of Placentia, Greenwich, in the United Kingdom. Henry VIII then later died on January 28th, 1547 in Palace of Whitehall, London, in the United Kingdom. His parents were Elizabeth of York and Henry VII. Henry became king when he was just ei ghteen years old. He was known for his love of hunting and dancing. (â€Å"Henry VIII†. BBC News.) Henry was known as theRead MoreThe Beloved Catherine of Aragon 1358 Words   |  5 PagesKing Henry VIII and his many wives. Very few remember his first wife, Catherine of Aragon. She was known as being quite beautiful and a great queen. Despite how poorly treated she was Catherine remained strong. The beloved Catherine of Aragon was the most remarkable queen due to the way she led her kingdom. Catherine, First Queen of King Henry VIII, daughter of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain, was born at Alcala de Henares on the 15 or 16 of December 1485. She is the youngest in her familyRead More Queen Elizabeth Essay examples1227 Words   |  5 PagesElizabeth I Queen Elizabeth, the first, proved to be a very good and loyal monarch to England. She brought about many changes, both good and bad. On September 7, 1533 a baby girl came into the world. Back then many parents would have been greatly disappointed to have had a baby girl, rather then a boy. However these parents were glad by the birth of their first child together. These proud parents were the king and queen of England, King Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. The girl child was named Elizabeth. TheRead MoreHenry Viii And The Succession1438 Words   |  6 Pages From 1533 to 1553 the succession line in England dismembered itself into a churning goblet of contrasting egos. (hook) One minute Henry VIII was declaring his fi rst born child a Bastard and his second child, the rightful ruler of England, the next minute he swore that both were bastards, and therefore needed to make a formal will. By doing this, Henry VIII had the unusual opportunity to choose his successor(s). First in line would be his new son, then his â€Å"bastard† daughters who would be named legitimateRead MoreBeing Bullied And Having No Recollection Essay1440 Words   |  6 PagesEducational Statistics, 2015) 64 percent of children who were bullied did not report it; only 36 percent reported the bullying.† (Pacer’s, 2016) Most children do not report it, leading to their self-esteem dropping to an all-time low. Whether the child turns to God or has a friend as their saving grace, it is important that they get through those troubles. My Experience The time in my life when I was bullied was a very rough patch and unfortunately a time that I have no memory of. My brain has seemedRead MoreHenry VIII: King of England1349 Words   |  6 PagesAs a monarch, the life of Henry VIII is one of which many do not attempt to describe because of the rich amount of history that goes along with him. No king has left such a profound impact on the past accounts of his country, or has been the focus of controversial topics that have made lasting contributions to his country. His means were immoral, but because of the greatness that he achieved, we look beyond his imperfection. On June 28, 1491, at Greenwich Palace, Henry VII and Elizabeth of YorkRead MoreElizabeth I And Two Miscarriages1501 Words   |  7 PagesBorn: Possibly end of May or early June between 1501 and 1507, specific date unknown. Probably born at Blickling (Norfolk). Parents: Sir Thomas Boleyn, Courtier and Diplomat, and Elizabeth, daughter of the Duke of Norfolk. Siblings: George Boleyn and Mary Boleyn. Married: Henry VIII of England. Married 25th January 1533, probably at the Palace of Whitehall. Divorced by her execution on the 19th of May 1936. Children: Elizabeth I and two miscarriages. Died: 19th May 1536, Chapel of St. Peter adRead MoreKing Henry VIII and his Great Impact on the History of England2165 Words   |  9 PagesKing Henry VIII was one of the most powerful rulers in the fifteenth century, who had a very captivating life many people are not aware of. Most people know Henry VIII as a berserk king with too many wives, but there is more to Henry VIII than that. Many few people know about his life and what he truly contributed to our world. Henry VIII was an almighty leader in England who won’t soon be forgotten. Henry VIII was born in Greenwich, England on June 28, 1491. At the age of just two yearsRead MoreQueen Elizabeth The 1st And Prime Minister Of England967 Words   |  4 Pages1st and Prime Minister of England, Margret Thatcher. Viewing the influences, achievements, and similarities throughout their periods of history, Elizabeth I was born to royalty, Margaret was born to common parents. Queen Elizabeth I was the daughter of King Henry VIII and her mother was Anne Boleyn. Elizabeth I was born on September 7, 1533, her parents were expecting a royal son, but instead they got a royal daughter, she was baptized and christened Elizabeth after her grandmother, Elizabeth ofRead MoreAnne Boleyn950 Words   |  4 PagesAna Bolena – Anne Boleyn 1501(1507)-1536 Queen of England 1533-1536 Mother of Elizabeth I Information about the early years of Anne Boleyn is almost non-existence; her birth has been dated from 1501 to 1507. Although information about her parents is abundant. Her father, Sir Thomas Boleyn, was named Sir in 1503. He was fluent with the languages, which allowed him to travel through Europe under the King’s orders and be part of important meetings. He was one of the bodyguards that took the

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

A Comparative Analysis of Hinduism, and Buddism - 1481 Words

Attempt a comparative analysis of Hinduism, and Buddhism with reference to their origins, beliefs, and practices Hinduism is an ancient religion whose origin and founder are not known. Hinduism is a combination of all types of different religious beliefs and philosophies that developed thousands of years ago, in India. All Hindus do not practice or follow the same doctrines. Although most follow the teachings of the Vedas, which is a collection of sacred texts, there are many different sects. For example, some worship the divine, who is called Atman, which is self, others worship Shiva and Vishnu. The highest class in Hinduism is the Brahmans, who are the priests. Hinduism is a very open-minded religion. This means†¦show more content†¦His father wanted him to become a world conqueror. As faith would have it, Suddharta saw the sufferings of some of his people and it disturbed him. When he was about twenty nine years old, he gave up all his worldly possessions and headed fo r the forest in search of enlightenment. Siddharta sort help from two Hindu masters in his quest for enlightenment. He also joined a band of ascetics, who follow the doctrine that a person can reach a higher spiritual state by practicing self-denial and rigorous self discipline. He almost died due to starvation by following their teachings. This made Siddharta realize that there must be a middle way between having too much and having too little. In the final stage of his quest, he began a combination of Hinduism’s raja yoga, which teaches driving the psychic energy to the deepest part, and mystic concentration. Siddharta sat under the Bo Tree and vowed not to move from that tree until he reached his goal. After overcoming all sorts of temptations, he finally achieved his goal of Great Awakening. After that, he was no longer Siddharta, but Buddha. Buddha founded an order of monks who he trained for three months of the year. The other nine months were devoted to preaching. His ministry lasted about forty-five years. He died at the age of eighty years old. Buddhists do not believe in reincarnation the same way as Hindus believe. Buddha

Charlotte Brontes character, Jane Eyre, is a young orphan girl Essay Example For Students

Charlotte Brontes character, Jane Eyre, is a young orphan girl Essay Charlotte Brontes character, Jane Eyre, is a young orphan girl. She has been provided with accommodation at Gateshead hall. She lives with her much-detested aunt and her privileged yet extremely loathsome cousins John, Georgiana and Eliza. The reason she lives with them is because it was the dying wish of her uncle reed, who is established as a benevolent character. Jane is treated badly by all at Gateshead hall apart from a servant named Bessie. Janes emotions as a character are established very, there is a great contrast in her emotions. To begin she shows sorrow and hatred. These treatments are shown due to the treatment Jane constantly endures from aunt Reed and John Reed. To begin Mrs reed is clearly a malevolent character and shows this by her bad treatments. Mrs reed excludes Jane from socialising with herself and her own kin, Mrs reed regrets regrets to be under the necessity of keeping Jane at a distanceà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ ¦ Jane sees this as an opportunity to indulge in pleasures of her own. However, Jane states that Mrs reed à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ ¦really must exclude her from privileges-only contended for happy, little children. Moving on to the terrible treatment Jane receives from her cousin John Reed. John frequently inflicts mental and physical abuse upon Janes fragile character. Jane endures the continuous tyranny from her corrupt cousin for several years. There is one main incident in which Jane breaks out and defends hers elf from the constant intimidation. Eliza and Georgiana are not as cruel to Jane as her aunt and cousin and therefore Jane does not despise them that greatly. The incident in which Charlotte Bronte establishes the character of Jane Eyre best is when she shows a change in Janes mood. Jane had been excluded by the Reeds and had found pleasure in a book. Nevertheless, John discovers Janes hide out and begins to question her. When John finally receives information of what Jane had been doing reading he shows an envious character. He demands the book saying, You have no business to take our books. Then as Jane was expecting, he hurls the volume towards her knocking her to the ground and causing her head to split. Jane finally does not submit to anymore violence and throws herself at John spitting with fury and showing all her rage. She is immediately halted and is then exiled to the eerie Red Room by the orders of Mrs Reed. The red room used to be the sleeping chambers of her now deceased Uncle Reed it also contains his deathbed which all petrified Jane. Charlotte Bronte establishes the fearful character of Jane Eyre in this section of the novel by using ghostly setting and a character that is hardly in the novel. Janes broad imagination obtains her body as she gasps as what she believes to be her late uncles eternal spirit. Her fear sends her body into a hysterical fit, which then is succumbed into a deep slumber. In the  opening chapters of the novel it holds a miserable and very gloomy setting to it. This is all done by the fact that Jane lives in Gateshead Hall were she is treated unwell. The estate may be portrayed as grand and lavish yet it has a dreary shadow cast over it. This is because of the poor treatment she receives and the lack of companionship she has to treasure at Gateshead Hall. However this is all stopped as Jane is finally separated from Gateshead as she is sent to Lowood charity school for girls. As much as Lowood is deprived of the luxuries Gateshead hall bears, it still holds a brighter atmosphere because it is very much adored by Jane. Charlotte uses the technique of setting here to establish character very well, she uses a school as Jane enjoys learning and expanding her knowledge she uses other girls to show Janes friendly character. .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906 , .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906 .postImageUrl , .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906 , .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906:hover , .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906:visited , .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906:active { border:0!important; } .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906:active , .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906 .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u6278d3728482f20e624f63411aa1b906:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Age Of Innocence EssayThe Novel holds the strong theme of love; this is highlighted well when Jane is at Lowood. However the love genre does not fall into romantic love but the love of others close companions. It shows the reaction of Jane to feel the love of Helen burns, Helen bestows Jane with the affection of a caring sister. The gentle and warm Miss Temple provides the same love and compassion to Jane in the form of a mother. This is the first love Jane has ever felt and certainly the first received. It portrays a very new character in Jane; she begins to show happiness and changes to a character with broader emotions not just hatred, now she shows love care for others and compassion. This is all because her acquaintances, Helen and Miss Temple treat her exceedingly affably. Janes character is unanticipated for the time the novel is written in. The usual rule of children being seen but not heard does not follow Janes behaviour. Jane shows resilience in particular chapters of the novel. She displays it against Mr Brocklehurst, Mrs Reed and John. As she is female, she shows a surprising character for that era of time. I was not interested in the book when we began reading. However, my interest grew as Charlotte Bronte began sculpting into a different character with mixed emotions. As the class continued reading the novel and my understanding broadened that Jane does not change scenery as much as I may have hoped. I wish the novel would also fall into the genre of adventure on certain occasions. Yet I still realise the skill involved in the novel and Brontes fascinating imagination also being dedicated. To conclude my piece of writing I think that Bronte establishes the character of Jane Eyre very well. She establishes the character of Jane by exploring how Jane reacts to other character, which is very genius. She also uses the setting very creatively and the events of Janes life also establish her character.

Research Literacy Health Practice

Question: Discuss about the Research Literacy for Health Practice. Answer: Introduction: Azidothymidine (AZT) or Zidovudine (ZDV) is an antiretroviral medication that is used for the treatment and prevention of AIDS/HIV. It helps in the treatment by reducing the viral replication that brings improvement in the blood tests and symptoms. It is also used in the prevention of transmission of HIV from the mother to the child. Although AZT slows the progression of AIDS in the patients by reducing the replication of HIV, it does not stop it completely (Kanters et al., 2016). The HIV becomes AZT-resistant with the progress of time and therefore, it is used in conjunction with the other medications of anti-HIV in the form of a combination therapy known as highly active antiretroviral therapy. The treatment of AIDS has undergone a drastic change in the past twenty years as the treatment options and knowledge has increased drastically. The combination therapy of antiretroviral medications delays the progression of AIDS but do possess substantial adverse effects and complications (A rts Hazuda, 2012). WHO has laid down guidelines for the AZT therapy for delivering comprehensive HIV care in the public health approach. The guidelines are focused on maximizing the survival of the population by standardized sequencing of the therapy delivered by simplified approaches and is supported by basic laboratory and clinical monitoring (World Health Organization, 2013). This assignment is aimed at providing recommendations for the funding of a health intervention of adopting AZT therapy for the HIV treatment for the indigenous population of Australia through critical appraisal of research articles. The tools used for the purpose are CASP tool and the Onemda Critical Appraisal Tool for critically appraising the articles. The literature search was carried out for the peer-reviewed journals and research articles on the topic of adopting AZT therapy for the treatment of HIV. The quality of the searched articles was determined by their ability to reflect on the research topic and the critical appraisal was compared with other similar articles to gain a broader knowledge on the research topic. Five academic databases were employed for the literature search that included Pubmed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Cochrane Library. Only the empirical research papers that were published in English were selected for the study to recognize the international debate on the topic. The search period included for the study included recent articles from the last six years and the data collection tool for the inclusion and exclusion criteria was PRISMA tool. The search terms used for the study were Azidothymidine (AZT) therapy, HIV and indigenous population. The exclusion criteria included articles that were not within the study period, not focused on the research topic and not in English. The first article used for the literature review was Antiretroviral treatment use, co-morbidities and clinical outcomes among Aboriginal participants in the Australian HIV Observational Database (AHOD) by Templeton et al. (2015). The researchers provided a clear statement about the aims of the research and since there was a dearth of publications regarding the co-morbidities and clinical outcomes of the Indigenous Australians suffering from HIV, the authors carried out this study. The study described the use of antiretroviral medications like AZT among the HIV patients of the indigenous population of Australia and compared the outcomes with the non-indigenous participants with the consideration of the demographic factors. A prospective cohort study was carried out at 27 AHOD (Australian HIV Observation Database) sites that included sexual health clinics, general practice clinics and tertiary referral centers. The patients were selected in a non-random manner and it ruled out the chan ces of biases. Ethical approval was obtained from the human research ethics committee of Australia and the relevant review boards. Development of study procedures was done in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration. Although it did not include the ethical approval of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, the researchers had the written informed consent from the participating patients. Quantitative research design was employed for the study and it was appropriate as it gave an accurate outcome of the use of cART (combination Antiretroviral Therapy) with medications like AZT and the comparative results were appropriately derived. 3894 participants were recruited to the study by March 2013 and included 20 sites of AHOD. The Indigenous status was present for 2197 participants. This recruitment strategy was appropriate to support the aims of the research as it aimed to study the use of the cART among the indigenous and non-indigenous populations. Data collection was carried prior to and during the research study. Clinical and demographic data were collected during enrolment and the various laboratory data were collected during the study to demonstrate the efficacy of the treatment. Data collection method was appropriate enough to address the research topic during the post-cART initiation for 24 months. However, in the study, the relationship between the participants and the researcher was not adequately considered. This was practically not possible considering the huge number of participants from both the indigenous and non-indigenous communities. The data analysis was sufficiently rigorous considering the fact that descriptive statistics was employed for comparing the clinical information and patient demographics between the non-indigenous and indigenous AHOD participants. Apart from these, chi-square tests and t-tests were done for the categorical and continuous variables. This signifies the depth of the analysis carried out by the researchers for understanding the effect of the cART on both the types of participants. The statement of findings was stated in the discussion part and the clinical outcomes from the result were elaborated. Virological suppression was considered the most effective measure for the successful response to the applied cART. From the study, it was found that virological suppression was found in more than 80% of the participants who were treated with cART like AZT. This research was valuable for several reasons. This is because the study not only reflected good care engagement in care from its successfu l virological suppression, but also demonstrated the fact that there were very little or no differences in results between the indigenous and non-indigenous populations. This suggests that cART can be successfully utilized for the treatment of indigenous population of Australia suffering from HIV infections. However, the researchers have also pointed an important fact that adherence is the most important predictor that plays a crucial role in the virological suppression among the patients of HIV. Poor adherence can lead to reduce the durability of the regimen by causing drug resistance. These important findings from this study that has to be kept in consideration while designing the AZT therapy for the indigenous population in Australia. Another study was carried out by Dempsey et al. (2015) titled Improving treatment outcomes for HIV-positive Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at Cairns Sexual Health using the treatment cascade as a model and reflected on the activities of the multidisciplinary team of the health professionals of the Aboriginals and the Torres Strait Islanders for improving their treatment outcomes. The study had a clear statement of the aim of the research as it targeted to implement the treatment cascade as the model for gauging the success for the improvement of the outcomes of health of the indigenous patients suffering from HIV. The researchers focused on meeting adequately the client needs regarding service engagement, initiation, followed by adherence to ART (Antiretroviral Therapy). Qualitative methodology was used for carrying out this study as the intern pharmacists of the clinic carried out an audit by carrying out interviews of the indigenous HIV patients visiting the clinic. T he interview process helped in getting clear idea of the engagement of the HIV patients with the ART like AZT or non-adherence of the patients with the therapy. The research design was appropriate to address the aim of the research since the study had limited number of cases and qualitative studies are the best possible method for providing the individual case information. The study included 25 patients from the clinic who were HIV positive and belonged to the indigenous community. The recruitment strategy was appropriate for the study as it aimed at improving the treatment outcomes of the indigenous HIV patients and recruited the patients on the basis of the fact that 22 patients received ART, 20 engaged in cure and 16 cases were undetectable. Data collection was conducted for a period of 12 months and towards the end of the study, the study population rose to 29 patients with 27 males and 2 females. Data collection from the patient interview gave essential feedback from the patients that reflected on the facilitators and barriers of the treatment, especially with the use of the ART. Therefore, it addressed the research issue significantly as it helped to identify the treatment shortfalls and provided remedies for overcoming them. However, in the study, the relationship between the researcher and the participants has been considered as it helped them to conduct the interview and collect the data. Ethical approval was obtained from the ethics committee of Cairn s Hospital and Health Services. The data analysis was sufficiently rigorous as it interpreted comparative results between the patients of the clinic and Australia wide prevalence of the factors like % engaged in care, % undetectable and % on ART. It also demonstrated the study progress over the time for the similar variables to represent the improvement in treatment outcome from the study. The statement of findings clearly stated that those patients who needed the maximum care for the treatment of HIV remained in ART for better outcomes. This makes the research valuable as it pointed out the fact that ART with AZT can be valuable in the treatment of HIV for the indigenous patients and adherence to the treatment is essential to improve the treatment outcomes. To support the findings from both these studies, there are several other articles which demonstrated similar traits. Cohen et al. (2016) carried out a study titled Antiretroviral therapy for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission where ART (with AZT) was offered to the patients who suffered from HIV-1 infection. The study assigned 1763 participants from nine countries where the couples were assigned randomly to two study groups. Statistical analysis was carried to analyze the study findings. From the recent reports, it is obvious that early initiation of the AZT therapy or ART can help to reduce the HIV-1 complications and preserve the immune function. From the study, it was found that apart from these advantages, ART helped to provide health benefits to the study participants on whom the treatment was applied. This study was important from the aspect that it gave a detailed account of the application of ART on the HIV patients on the patients of several countries of the world. ART was found to have public health benefits in the treatment of HIV. To provide momentum to the results of the study, univariate and multivariate analysis of the collected data was also carried out along with the baseline study. This in-depth analysis ensured the fact that ART can be successfully used for the treatment of HIV. Another opinion study was carried out by Laskey Siliciano (2014) A mechanistic theory to explain the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy for proposing a fundamental theory for explaining the mechanistic basis of the cART (with AZT). The study provided an in-depth knowledge of the cART and the theory of its efficacy with respect to the dose-response relationship. From the study, it has been found that the greatest obstacle is drug resistance for the treatment of HIV-1. The study have argued that the median effect model is the best fit method for the description of the dose-response relationship of the ART as the efficacy of ART gets reflected from the slope parameter . This study has been of importance for the fact that it not only provided the importance of ART in the treatment of HIV but it also focused on the resistance mutations which is of utmost importance for framing the treatment regime for HIV. Adherence to the treatment is important to prevent drug resistance with antiretroviral therapy. Broder (2010) conducted a similar study titled The development of antiretroviral therapy and its impact on the HIV-1/AIDS pandemic that is aimed at providing public health benefit with ART (with AZT). The researcher has extensively reviewed the studies since the era of the appearance of HIV-1 when it was considered untreatable. Since then, there have been significant changes in the treatment of the disease and ART is now no more limited to the resource-rich countries but also have it in the medical care of the resource poor countries. The researcher has also predicted the future of the treatment of HIV-1 with ART and has recommended that much research is required to transfer the knowledge from the laboratory to clinical practice for making the treatment more efficient without adverse effects. This article has also been important from the fact that it has focused not only on the treatment of HIV-1 but also considered the arenas of genetic diversity and viral drug resistance that are important from the perspectives of ART. Paradigm shifts has been proposed by the author against the host restriction factors and new viral targets or both of them that are essential while considering the treatment options with ART. Considering the recommendations from all the articles that have been critically analyzed, a comparative study can be conducted. Templeton et al. recommended that adherence has been one of the most important and predominant factors for the treatment of HIV-1 and poor adherence can lead to the development of drug resistance and reduce the durability of the regimen for the indigenous Australians. A similar recommendation was put forward by Dempsey et al. who further added the fact that the indigenous people who have newly diagnosed with the disease should remain in care with ART. Consecutively, the studies by Cohen et al., Laskey Siliciano and Broder had similar views on the treatment of HIV with AZT therapy and discussed the efficacy of the therapy in controlling the pandemic. The recommendations from these studies had a similar view that ART or AZT therapy is highly effective in the treatment of HIV among the indigenous population of Australia and precautions should be taken to conti nue the therapy without discontinuation. Recommendation An extensive literature search was carried out for establishing the efficacy of AZT therapy for the treatment of HIV and has been listed in Appendix 1. AZT is recommended in combination with the other anti-HIV medications for the treatment of HIV but not for curing it. It has also been found effective in the prevention of the mother to child transmission of HIV during childbirth and pregnancy (Lenzi, Wiens Pontarolo, 2015). Since monotherapy leads to the development of drug resistance, AZT should be used in combination therapy and it is absolutely safe for the fetus and the pregnant women. Arguably, it can be said that AZT has some severe adverse drug reactions like bone marrow toxicity, anemia, hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis, it can be prevented by close monitoring of the patients if the symptoms start to appear (Creagh, 2013). Therefore, it is recommended for the government department to fund the health intervention of adopting AZT therapy for the treatment of HIV for the indigenous Australians and the health workers should take initiatives to initiate the intervention in the respective indigenous communities in Australia. References Arts, E. J., Hazuda, D. J. (2012). HIV-1 antiretroviral drug therapy.Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine,2(4), a007161. Broder, S. (2010). The development of antiretroviral therapy and its impact on the HIV-1/AIDS pandemic.Antiviral research,85(1), 1-18. Cohen, M. S., Chen, Y. Q., McCauley, M., Gamble, T., Hosseinipour, M. C., Kumarasamy, N., ... Godbole, S. V. (2016). Antiretroviral therapy for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission.New England Journal of Medicine,375(9), 830-839. Creagh, T. H. (2013). We can illustrate an ambispective cohort study with our multicenter intensive postmarketing surveillance study which follows a group of patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease treated with zidovudine (RETROVIR8, AZT).] In late 1987, we began identifying every patient ever presenting with a diagnosis of HIV.Drug Epidemiology and Post-Marketing Surveillance,224, 53. Dempsey, M., Elliott, M., Gorton, C., Leamy, J., Yeganeh, S., Scott, K. (2015). Improving treatment outcomes for HIV-positive Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at Cairns Sexual Health using the treatment cascade as a model.HIV Australia,13(3), 36. Kanters, S., Vitoria, M., Doherty, M., Socias, M. E., Ford, N., Forrest, J. I., ... Mills, E. J. (2016). Comparative efficacy and safety of first-line antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV infection: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.The Lancet HIV. Laskey, S. B., Siliciano, R. F. (2014). A mechanistic theory to explain the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy.Nature Reviews Microbiology,12(11), 772-780. Lenzi, L., Wiens, A., Pontarolo, R. (2015). Comparison of antiretroviral schemes used in initial therapy for treatment of HIV/Aids.Acta Biomdica Brasiliensia,4(1), 67-73. Templeton, D. J., Wright, S. T., McManus, H., Lawrence, C., Russell, D. B., Law, M. G., Petoumenos, K. (2015). Antiretroviral treatment use, co-morbidities and clinical outcomes among Aboriginal participants in the Australian HIV Observational Database (AHOD).BMC infectious diseases,15(1), 1. World Health Organization. (2013). Global update on HIV treatment 2013: results, impact and opportunities.